This is not a skating dress.

FrontIt is a creative and scenographic object.

It is a document of a creative process.

It is an archive of choreographic / training practice.

It can be re-imagined, re-examined and re-created through digital media.

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digital methods

Digital viewpoints; re-seeing scenography

Digital scenography

Digital research method

To begin the development of the costume for ‘Dance with me’ for the Edinburgh Fringe (2015) I challenged and explored how a traditional skating dress could and would be used. Rather than apply the dress to the body as a layer of decoration I used it to reflect and record my training process. After every training session I wrote each move of each exercise on the fabric. The top half of the dress contains this document. On the bottom (skirt) half I drew images from the changing choreography.

I further examined the costume, how I made sense of and interpreted it and how I could work with it in performance using photography and digital editing software. This explorative process facilitated a different type of scenographic play through which I could explore the creative and transformative relationship between the performing body and this item of costume. This process specifically enabled me to examine the relationship between character, dress and the moving body and led to new ideas and questions regarding the development of this costume.

Creating and documenting scenography

 

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To develop the costume further I asked Sangita Champaneri, a designer and constructor to re-create the dress; to re-present the costume and challenge the flowing, delicate qualities of the fabric. To break it down so that it could be something new.

Photo (left) © Sangita Champaneri 2015.

 

 

 

 

The ice-skates:skates

To read my work on ice-skates as costume and as training/creative tools please use the image below to link to my research paper:Drawing on ice

'There are times when the simple dignity of movement can fulfill the function of a volume of words.' - Doris Humphrey.